These five cases were recently added to the growing Uncovered database of the unsolved cases of the missing and murdered; with the help of the public. With more than 200,000 unsolved cases in the US—and a number that grows by nearly 6,000 every year; your insights might help contribute to the next big break in a case. You might be able to help solve a cold case!

Cynthia Constantine

Missing since July 11, 1969, from Oakdale, New York.

On a warm July evening in the city of Oakdale, New York, 15-year-old Cynthia Constantine was preparing her dog for a walk. Once everything was ready, she heads out of her home, leash in hand, and walked toward a wooded area near the Oakdale Long Island Railroad station. Cynthia was last seen entering the woods near the railroad station by three young boys. Shortly after, the family dog returned to the Constantine home without Cynthia. Several searches in the following days would prove unsuccessful. If you have any information, please contact the Suffolk County Police Department or the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. View the digital case file 

 

Brianna Maitland

Missing since March 19, 2004, from Montgomery, Vermont.

In 2004, Brianna was only 17-years-old; a waitress who was constantly described as kind, charismatic, independent, truly free-spirited, and having a love of funny hats. Brianna was last seen leaving her waitressing job on the night of March 19, 2004, and had told coworkers that she was heading home so she could go to sleep ahead of her early-morning shift the following day. The next day, Brianna’s car was found backed into an abandoned farmhouse at an odd angle, with her personal belongings, including two uncashed paychecks, still inside the car. If you have any information, please contact the Vermont State Police. View the digital case file 

 

Ashley Loring HeavyRunner

Missing since June 5, 2017, from Browning, Montana

Ashley vanished in the summer of 2017; a strong advocate for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, she disappeared after last being seen at a party on a nearby reservation in Browning, Montana. When her sister returns from a trip and realizes that her sister was missing, she begins relentlessly searching the vast area of the reservation. Her searches for her sister relentlessly continued until a pair of red-stained boots and a torn sweater, believed to belong to Ashley, were found. Ashley’s family is concerned for her safety and continues searching for her. View the digital case file 

 

Wilhelmina Whitewater

Missing since July 31, 2018, from Tsaile, Arizona

Wilhelmina left her house in Tsaile, Arizona on July 31st, 2018 with the intention of coming back. She never returned or contacted any family members. She has not been seen since. Wilhelmina “Mina” Denise Whitewater is a registered member of the Navajo/Dine tribe. Please contact the Navajo Police Department if you know what happened to Mina. View the digital case file 

 

Asha Degree

Missing since February 14, 2000, from Shelby, North Carolina.

Nine-year-old Asha Degree was last seen by a motorist walking down Highway 18 in Shelby, NC after leaving her home alone in the middle of the night during a storm. Her mother reported her missing after realizing that Asha wasn’t in the family’s home the following morning. Later that day, Asha’s belongings, including pencils, candy wrappers, and a bowtie are found in the doorway of a shed near the area she was last seen by the property’s owner. Unfortunately, police wouldn’t be notified about the owner’s findings until 2001. In August of 2001, Asha’s backpack, which was double-wrapped in trash bags, and held a Dr. Seuss book and a ‘New Kids on the Block’ shirt, was found by a construction worker around 26 miles away from her family’s home, along Highway 18. If you have any information, please contact the FBI – Charlotte Field Office or the Cleveland County Sheriff’s Office. View the digital case file 

 


 

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